Could I use a camera with this telescope?

Could I use a camera with this telescope?

I would like to buy a first telescope and don'-t want to spend more than ?200. I would really like to be able to use it for photography of planets. I wondered if I could use this telescope to take some pictures using either an SLR, or a standard Canon Powershot IXUS 80 IS. Website: http://www.opticalvision.co.uk/astronomi…Thanks!

Larry454

While I am impressed by your enthusiasm, I would recommend that you take your time with this decision. Skywatcher provides good products and backs them well, but this is not, in my opinion, a very good choice for a beginner. In addition, trying to take astrophotographs using this configuration would be difficult at best, especially with the cameras that you mentioned. Here is why I say these things:1. You will be able to see the Moon and planets with this scope, but you will see little else. Once you see - and perhaps even photograph - the solar system objects 20 or 30 times, you will want to see other objects, but the small aperture on this scope will not allow you to do that.2. If you use these cameras to try to take photos of the planets, you will have to mount them to the focuser using an adapter of some kind. This will badly unbalance the scope and prevent any tracking at all. This is turn will make it really tough to get clear images. Most of those who photograph the planets these days use webcams with faster, shorter scopes. These webcams will allow you to take several images and stack them using the accompanying software. Accurate tracking is nice, but not essential - for webcam images of the solar system only. Webcams are not terribly expensive, but they will cost a lot more than you are currently budgeted for. You could also use a piggy back mount, but this does not use the scope in the optical light path for the camera, so the scope optics do not affect the photos and I would still go for more aperture.3. Since you are a beginner, you will find that there is a lot to learn about the sky before you start taking pictures. All of the folks I know who are successful at astrophotography have years of experience and have invested several thousand dollars. It simply is not as easy as pointing the scope and opening the shutter. Amateur astronomy is a great hobby just using visual methods, and that is a good way to prepare for the more painstaking efforts involved in astrophotography.I do not want to dampen your interest. I would just like to see you approach this branch of the hobby in a realistic fashion. I would highly recommend that you take the time to really understand what you are getting into before you buy something that will gather dust because it's tough (almost impossible) to use in the way you want to use it. Patience is a virtue. In the hobby of amateur astronomy, it is an absolute essential. Now is the time to start. Best of luck.

Mark

That really is the wrong scope for what you're trying to do, and you're also looking to use the wrong type of camera to get good results for imaging planets.SLRs are good for bright large scale obects - like the Moon, or the Orion nebula. Even in a relatively long focus telescope, planets will be pretty small, so it makes sense to use a camera with a relatively small chip so the object you're imaging can fill a reasonable portion of the frame..The inexpensive planet cameras cost about Larry454

While I am impressed by your enthusiasm, I would recommend that you take your time with this decision. Skywatcher provides good products and backs them well, but this is not, in my opinion, a very good choice for a beginner. In addition, trying to take astrophotographs using this configuration would be difficult at best, especially with the cameras that you mentioned. Here is why I say these things:1. You will be able to see the Moon and planets with this scope, but you will see little else. Once you see - and perhaps even photograph - the solar system objects 20 or 30 times, you will want to see other objects, but the small aperture on this scope will not allow you to do that.2. If you use these cameras to try to take photos of the planets, you will have to mount them to the focuser using an adapter of some kind. This will badly unbalance the scope and prevent any tracking at all. This is turn will make it really tough to get clear images. Most of those who photograph the planets these days use webcams with faster, shorter scopes. These webcams will allow you to take several images and stack them using the accompanying software. Accurate tracking is nice, but not essential - for webcam images of the solar system only. Webcams are not terribly expensive, but they will cost a lot more than you are currently budgeted for. You could also use a piggy back mount, but this does not use the scope in the optical light path for the camera, so the scope optics do not affect the photos and I would still go for more aperture.3. Since you are a beginner, you will find that there is a lot to learn about the sky before you start taking pictures. All of the folks I know who are successful at astrophotography have years of experience and have invested several thousand dollars. It simply is not as easy as pointing the scope and opening the shutter. Amateur astronomy is a great hobby just using visual methods, and that is a good way to prepare for the more painstaking efforts involved in astrophotography.I do not want to dampen your interest. I would just like to see you approach this branch of the hobby in a realistic fashion. I would highly recommend that you take the time to really understand what you are getting into before you buy something that will gather dust because it's tough (almost impossible) to use in the way you want to use it. Patience is a virtue. In the hobby of amateur astronomy, it is an absolute essential. Now is the time to start. Best of luck.

00usd and are based on web cameras. The other thing is for planets, the way to go is to take hundreds or even thousands of shots and "stack" them using a program like Registax. So actually, we shoot "movies" to create one still image.As for the scope, there's no sense buying a tracking mount for imaging unless it's an equatorial mount. The one you've asked about is an alt-az mount. While it can follow the object across the sky, you'll d find the object would appear to rotate over time. Visually, this isn't a problem. But if you wanted to take a time exposure to photograph the Orion Nebula, it would come out blurry.For imaging, a good quality mount is the most important part of the equipment.The optical tube you're looking at is also not suited for imaging planets. Besides the limited aperture, it's an achromat. Achromats will show a purple halo around bright objects because they have limited color correction. When you focus them, you're really focusing on the green part of the color spectrum. Red and blue come to focus at a slightly different spot, and they combine to form purple. In the budget price range, you'd be much better off with a telescope like a Newtonian reflector because mirrors don't need color correction.Frankly, your best bet is to get involved with a local astronomy club. The members there will have more experience than you, and they'll be happy to help you get started. You might also find a member who would be willing to let you put your camera in his scope for a while to experiment with astro photograpy.Here is a photo of Jupiter and Io taken with my telescope:< http://www.holden-insurance.com/jupiter8… >For those who are interested that's about 1000 frames on an Imaging Source DB21 camera, and the telescope was an Astro Physics 140 on an Astro Physics Mach1gto mount with an Astro Physics Barcon and a TMB 1.8 barlow. It was processed with Registax and Photoshop.Here's a photo I took of the Orion nebula with a Nikon D70 DSLR.< http://www.picturetrail.com/sfx/album/vi… >Source(s):Over 30 years as an amateur astronomer

Bullseye

Possible, but you will need to take short exposures and then stack them using software.After about 15-25 seconds "field rotation" will become visible in the photo.

GeoffG

That telescope is really not suitable for photography. The aperture (80mm) is too small to show much detail on the planets and the mount is too shaky to support a camera steadily.Here are a few web pages with good information on beginner's telescopes:http://www.gaherty.ca/tme/TME0702_Buying…http://www.scopereviews.com/begin.htmlhttp://observers.org/beginner/j.r.f.begi…For more advanced information, read Phil Harrington's Star Ware, 4th edition (Wiley).You'll get the greatest value for your money with a Newtonian reflector on a Dobsonian mount, such as these:http://www.telescope.com/control/categor…http://www.skywatchertelescope.net/swtin…Buy from a store which specializes in telescopes and astronomy, either locally or online- don't buy from department stores, discount stores or eBay as mostly what they sell is junk. Find your local astronomy club and try out different telescopes at one of their star parties:http://www.skyandtelescope.com/community…I strongly recommend that beginners steer clear of astrophotography until they have learned their way around the sky. Astrophotography is by far the most expensive and difficult area of amateur astronomy.Many people who buy telescopes have no idea how to find interesting things to observe. A good introduction to finding things is NightWatch by Terence Dickinson (Firefly). A more advanced book is Star Watch by Phil Harrington (Wiley).

Yahoo

if you have to ask, the answer is no.wrong scope.wrong mount.lack of experience.astrophotography is a *lot* harder than it looks.Source(s):i'm a clone. it's really cool.

Daryl

+I whole-heartedly agree with Larry and Geoff. There is so much more to astrophotography than you could possibly imagine. It is a field of interest that takes several years to become familiar with and produce good, quality photographs. The variables are so numerous, I would not even mention them all here in this answer, but some were touched upon already. The fact that you say you don't want to spend more than 200 indicates that your resources at this time won't allow you to pursue this. Put another zero on the end and maybe you will have the BASIC, MINIMUM equipment you need for this venture. The planetary shots you take want can be achieved with a good camera, a good tripod and very short exposures (especially when they are bright and highly visible to the naked eye as Jupiter is right now).

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