I am moving to Canada in February 2008, I have several questions. Please Help!!! :)?

I am moving to Canada in February 2008, I have several questions. Please Help!!! :)?

I will be moving to Canada in February of 2008. I have several questions that I am needing answered. I will be moving from the US to Vancouver, BC....Thanks in advance!1) Does your credit history follow you when you move to Canada?2) Does your driving history follow you when you move to Canada? And can I just trade in my US drivers license and get a BC license?3) I am an MRI technologist, I believe it falls under the skilled migration, so how hard would it be to get a work visa?4) When I move what happens with my american car loan? Credit cards?5) How do I go about getting auto insurance in Canada, and when am I eligible for health insurance in Canada?6) How long do you have to live/work in Canada to become a citizen? I do plan on having dual citizenship at some point in the future.7) Where is the best place to look for healthcare jobs in Vancouver? Does anybody know of a website besides workopolis?Thanks!!!!!!

Dovekie

I am a Canadian and I lived in the US for two years. I couldn't get a credit card there the first year because I didn't have a credit history in the U.S. So, my credit did not follow me from Canada. I would imagine that it would be the same for you.Many states have reciprocal agreements with Canadian provinces with regards to driving records. B.C. has an exchange program with the U.S. So, all you need to do is trade in your state license for the B.C. license. http://www.icbc.com/licensing/lic_renew_…As for work visas, you can see about immigrating as a skilled worker. But this process may take some time and you need to apply before leaving the U.S. See: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/i…If you are prepared to wait, I would think that you would have no trouble getting an invitation as we need all sorts of medical professionals in Canada. The poster above stated that you need a job lined-up -- this would be helpful, of course, however, if you look at the CIC site, this is not a requirement if you are applying to immigrate as a skilled worker. They state what the minimum requirements are and there is a points system in place. Having arranged employment is worth 10 points out of a possible 100: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/s… - of course, a job offer would make things easier. There are plenty of people who come to Canada from other countries and they don't have jobs lined-up.There is a provincial nominee program whereby if you can get a job offer, you can apply to immigrate: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/p…Why don't you try contacting the B.C. Association of Medical Radiation Technologists to find out what you might need to work in B.C.? http://www.bcamrt.bc.ca/ You likely need to be licensed in B.C.You need to find out if you can export your car. This site tells you all you need to do: http://www.riv.ca/ - The car loan might be an issue if the title is not clear. See: http://www.i-b-t.net/anm/templates/trade…It might be easier to sell the car.If you plan on keeping a residence in the U.S., you could keep your credit cards. This might be important only until you establish credit in Canada. But, what if you decide to return to the U.S.?You will need Cdn auto insurance and there are plenty of companies in Canada that also provide insurance in the U.S. State Farm is one, for example.You will need to live in Canada for 3 years out of 4 years preceding your application: https://services3.cic.gc.ca/rescalc/resC…You would be eligible for B.C. health insurance after a period of residency in that province - apply when you arrive. So, you should carry some kind of health insurance until this kicks in: http://www.health.gov.bc.ca/msp/infoben/…If you are planning on leaving the U.S. permanently, you should know that you will have to file a U.S. tax return as well as a Cdn. return. You should be able to exclude your Cdn. income on the U.S. return, though - so, no double-taxation.Try Career Builder http://www.careerbuilder.ca/CA/Default.a…Monsterhttp://www.monster.caBut the provincial association for your field noted above will likely have job information.Hope this helps.And, for the poster from France, you do have to prove that you are financially independent - for one person this is about Dovekie

I am a Canadian and I lived in the US for two years. I couldn't get a credit card there the first year because I didn't have a credit history in the U.S. So, my credit did not follow me from Canada. I would imagine that it would be the same for you.Many states have reciprocal agreements with Canadian provinces with regards to driving records. B.C. has an exchange program with the U.S. So, all you need to do is trade in your state license for the B.C. license. http://www.icbc.com/licensing/lic_renew_…As for work visas, you can see about immigrating as a skilled worker. But this process may take some time and you need to apply before leaving the U.S. See: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/i…If you are prepared to wait, I would think that you would have no trouble getting an invitation as we need all sorts of medical professionals in Canada. The poster above stated that you need a job lined-up -- this would be helpful, of course, however, if you look at the CIC site, this is not a requirement if you are applying to immigrate as a skilled worker. They state what the minimum requirements are and there is a points system in place. Having arranged employment is worth 10 points out of a possible 100: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/s… - of course, a job offer would make things easier. There are plenty of people who come to Canada from other countries and they don't have jobs lined-up.There is a provincial nominee program whereby if you can get a job offer, you can apply to immigrate: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/p…Why don't you try contacting the B.C. Association of Medical Radiation Technologists to find out what you might need to work in B.C.? http://www.bcamrt.bc.ca/ You likely need to be licensed in B.C.You need to find out if you can export your car. This site tells you all you need to do: http://www.riv.ca/ - The car loan might be an issue if the title is not clear. See: http://www.i-b-t.net/anm/templates/trade…It might be easier to sell the car.If you plan on keeping a residence in the U.S., you could keep your credit cards. This might be important only until you establish credit in Canada. But, what if you decide to return to the U.S.?You will need Cdn auto insurance and there are plenty of companies in Canada that also provide insurance in the U.S. State Farm is one, for example.You will need to live in Canada for 3 years out of 4 years preceding your application: https://services3.cic.gc.ca/rescalc/resC…You would be eligible for B.C. health insurance after a period of residency in that province - apply when you arrive. So, you should carry some kind of health insurance until this kicks in: http://www.health.gov.bc.ca/msp/infoben/…If you are planning on leaving the U.S. permanently, you should know that you will have to file a U.S. tax return as well as a Cdn. return. You should be able to exclude your Cdn. income on the U.S. return, though - so, no double-taxation.Try Career Builder http://www.careerbuilder.ca/CA/Default.a…Monsterhttp://www.monster.caBut the provincial association for your field noted above will likely have job information.Hope this helps.And, for the poster from France, you do have to prove that you are financially independent - for one person this is about $10,000: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/s… Incidentally, since Canada is a bilingual country, if the French poster is adept in English and French, this would be beneficial.

0,000: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/s… Incidentally, since Canada is a bilingual country, if the French poster is adept in English and French, this would be beneficial.

CanTexan

For the most part, your US credit history does NOT follow you to Canada. It may become a factor after you become a Candian resident (been in the country 6 months), but for those first six months, you have NO history (same as a Canadian going to the US).Your driving record DOES follow you to Canada. Where you fall when trading your US license for a provinical one depends on your record. A good record (and sufficient time behind the wheel to qualify for a "full" license in a province with graduated licensing) will mean your Canadian license starts with no blemishes. If you are recently licensed or have a bad record, you may start out at the same level as a newly-licensed Canadian, i.e. at the bottom of the graduated scale.If you're planning on working once you come into Canada, start now to get the paperwork in order. You'll need guaranteed employment, first of all, even if you meet the "skilled immigrant" category. You cannot enter on a non-work visa and seek employment or actually be employed. (You also cannot become a permanent resident while on a tourist or student visa classification!)Your American car loan is a debt you still have to repay ... and if the vehicle is not owned outright in your name (no loans or liens), you cannot bring it across into the country for permanent use. The same goes for for your US credit cards ... you still owe money on the US side of the border. You've accrued the debt, you have to pay. You can still use your US cards in Canada ... the only thing that will kick in is that you'll be hit with a "foreign currency" charge every time you do so. Better to sign up with a Canadian bank and use it's cards while in the country.To obtain auto insurance, you'll have to basically provide your Canadian driving record ... which means at first you're going to be treated like a kid who has just received their license. It will be steep! Any company will insure you ... look around and do some comparison shopping. Stick with the bigger players, though, if you think you might actually have to pay out for an accident claim. It's a little more cash out of your pocket at first, but they're better in the long run and easier to get money from.Health insurance can be applied for once you become a resident of the province you're residing in. For BC, that means approximately 6 months (183 days) before applying, and another couple of weeks for them to process the paperwork. For coverage in between your arrival and the start date of your provincial coverage (not the application date), get travel insurance from someone like BlueCross.You need to accrue at least 3 years (in some cases 5 years) to apply for permanent residency ... starting from the time you are actually a provincial resident. Once you have permanent residency, the citizenship process is another 2-5 years."monster.ca" and "workopolis.ca" are online sites to do job searches. Also check trade magazines, health care provider listings, and newspapers (both local and national). use your contacts within your field of interest ... someone may hear about something and let you know. And of course, it never hurts to ask!

nbr660

1)NO 2)yes 3)apply now for "out of country" work permit right now before you move, 4)with your car loans & credit cards once you leave US, you can pay them or forget them in Canada because you will get a whole new idenity here. 5)you get car insurance the same way as the states do, health insurance when work permit is issued. 6) must be Perm.Resid. five years before citizenship 7) look up jobs Canada. http://cic.gc.ca or 1-888-242-2100 is a good place to start.Source(s):American living in Canada

TO

Sorry, I'm not really answering any of your questions because I am just as curious about these things as you are ( I also have to move by Feb. 2008), but in response to the above answer, I thought you had to be a permanent resident for 3 years in order to qualify for citizenship. Have the policies been changed?

Susan

For most of your questions, I don't know.. but...Here's a good place to start with the immigration questions: http://www.canada.gc.ca/main_e.htmlAnd for the jobs in the healthcare field: http://jobbank.gc.ca/Intro_en.aspxhttp://www.bcbio.com/And about the auto insurance/driver's license info: http://www.icbc.com/

hilarywow

#7 check out the websites for the various health regions. (Fraser Health, Vancouver Coastal Health, Vancouver Island Health). Each website has it's own job postings, they tend to not post elsewhere. I don't know if your previous experience and education is accepted here, that's something that you need to find out before you move here.

kingstonsean

1) Your credit history does not follow you. It is accessible to Canadian companies, but most of them won't bother to investigate your US credit history. Even though the major credit reporting agencies are the same in both countries, they operate as separate entities. Same problem for Canadians who want to move to the US. You basically have to start over again and build up a new credit history.2) You probably don't have a US driver's license - it's likely issued by the state that you live in. If your state has a treaty with BC to accept each other's drivers licenses then you'll just have to exchange it in BC. If they don't, then you'll have to take a test. For instance, Illinois won't accept a Quebec license, but they will accept an Ontario license.3) Apply for your work visa in advance. If you show up at the border saying that you want to live and work in Canada without the proper paperwork they will probably send you away.4) You will still be responsible for all your US debts. You will not get a new identity when you move to Canada.5) Auto insurance in BC is available through BCAA - the "auto club" (like AAA). health insurance in most provinces is only available to permanent residents after you've lived there for a while (3 months in Ontario).6) Don't know.7) Don't know.

Oxane

Good question, I wondered about the same questions. The difference is that I want to leave France to come to Canada, and I heard that you have to bring the proof of funds available to support you during the first year you live there (CANhilarywow

#7 check out the websites for the various health regions. (Fraser Health, Vancouver Coastal Health, Vancouver Island Health). Each website has it's own job postings, they tend to not post elsewhere. I don't know if your previous experience and education is accepted here, that's something that you need to find out before you move here.

0.000?), and that it can be difficult to find a job in Canada.Foreign workers must hold a valid working visa, what is not a permanent resident visa. And if you don't get a written job offer from a Canadain employer, you cannot apply for a work visa...When you are a permanent resident, you have to live there during 3 years before aspiring to be a citizen.

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