RBC Insurance Phone Calls?

RBC Insurance Phone Calls?

I can receive at least two phone calls from RBC Insurance to suggest us to join them in, but I have never told them my phone number. How can I find and know my phone number.Is that legally?Thanks for eveyone'-s answer.

car253

Great advice already listed. Get on the Do Not Call List.

PM

I get them all from all the banks, They still continue to call even though I tell them not to because I am a Certified Financial Planner, so I can take care of my own insurance needs.Anyways, the CRTC is introducing new Do Not Call rules effective Septtember 30, 2008, here in Canadahttp://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/NEWS/RELEASES/…

Jaesha

Likely they are using a random auto dialer. They can fix in according to geographic area, zip codes, area codes, etc. Or you may have signed up for some service with someone they have an agreement to share contacts with, which is common today. make sure that when you complete anything even if it's an application for credit, a new bank account to requests for free coupons, rebates, local raffle tickets, or store drawings, installing software, signing up for access to internet websites, using internet freebies (smilies, IM, animated cursors, etc), read the fine print. Often there is a tiny box where you can check that says, it's not okay to share my information with your affiliates.If it is an auto dialer, then the best thing for you do do is sign up on the National Do Not Call List. You can register all of your phones, including Cell and Fax. It will take about a month to kick in after you sign up, check the website but it works and it's free. I'm signed up on the National Do Not Call as well as the Texas Do Not Call and I never get any solicitation calls, unless it's from my bank or telephone company, go figure. Occasionally I will get a call from a market survey company, but NO Unsolicited Sales Calls. After several years I swear by it.Source links: 1st is a link to the National Do Not Call registry website. 2nd is a link to a website that lists every state that has a Do Not Call list as they are maintained independently of the National List. Remember it's a good idea to sign up for both of them.If RBC calls again, politely ask them to take you off of their list. You can also ask where they got your info, but often companies don't like to tell you that. But, legally they are obligated not to call you again and remove your number from their system or they are subject to legal penalties. You can file a complaint as well if they fail to comply after you have asked them to do so. Check online for the proper procedures and guidelines as to when a complaint is warranted. Just quote the Do Not Call law and I don't think they will bother you again.Good Luck! ~J~Source(s):https://www.donotcall.gov/http://www.ftc.gov/donotcallhttp://www.the-dma.org/government/donotc…

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